sepsis,sepsis awareness month,Wolters Kluwer

Sepsis awareness beyond September

As September draws to a close, so does this year’s “Sepsis Awareness Month.” 

With the hopes of extending attention beyond this month on a condition that kills someone every 2 minutes in America, we reached out to Sean Benson, Vice President and General Manager of Specialized Surveillance, Wolters Kluwer Health, to learn more about sepsis’ impacts and the factors hospital administrators ought to consider when creating an effective plan of action to improve health outcomes and lower cost at the same time. 

Mr. Benson co-founded ProVation Medical, now part of Wolters Kluwer Health, in 1994. He has been closely involved in most areas of the company’s operations, including Research & Development, Product Management, Sales, Marketing, Business Development and Client Services. Most recently, he has overseen the company’s newest clinical surveillance platform, POC Advisor.

(Editor’s note: To hear audio excerpts of this interview, click on the media player buttons that run throughout this article.)

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Huntsville Hospital,POC Advisor,sepsis,Sepsis Alliance,SIRS,Wolters Kluwer

Targeting instances of sepsis at Huntsville Hospital

Stephen Claypool, MD, Medical Director, Innovation Lab, Wolters Kluwer

Stephen Claypool, MD, Medical Director, POC Advisor, Wolters Kluwer

Evaluating the Impact of a Computerized Surveillance Algorithm and Decision Support System on Sepsis Mortality,” appeared in the June print edition of The Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (JAMIA). This study examined how clinicians at Alabama’s Huntsville Hospital decreased sepsis-related deaths by 53 percent during a 10-month period using a combination of clinical change management and electronic alerting from POC Advisor, a highly-accurate clinical decision support (CDS) software.

To learn more about this important implementation, we contacted Dr. Claypool, MD, Medical Director, POC Advisor, Wolters Kluwer.

(Editor’s note: To hear audio excerpts of this interview, click on the media player buttons that run throughout this article.)

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POC Advisor,Sepsis Alliance,Sepsis-2,sepsis-3,SIRS,spesis,Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome,Wolters Kluwer

Seeking a sharper focus on sepsis

Stephen Claypool, MD, Medical Director, Innovation Lab, Wolters Kluwer

Stephen Claypool, MD, Medical Director, POC Advisor, Wolters Kluwer

It’s been just a few weeks since boxing legend and activist Mohamand Ali died of sepsis, a condition that still remains greatly a mystery to many outside and inside healthcare. 

In our previous worked focusing upon sepsis, we learned several discrepancies exist in incidence and mortality reporting due to the host of definitions and terminologies used for sepsis in the field.

Formally, sepsis definitions have been largely unchanged for more than two decades, that is, until the recent publication of “Assessment of Clinical Criteria for Sepsis: For the Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3)“.

There are now only two identified stages of sepsis: Sepsis and septic shock, as the new sepsis-3 definitions are designed to apply only to patients with life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. “Severe” sepsis is no longer used in the terminology and the milder stage of sepsis that was identified as “sepsis” by SIRS+ (Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome) criteria is no longer recognized. With this new definition, “sepsis” now best correlates with the old version’s status of severe sepsis.

Seeking clarification, we decided to contact Dr. Claypool, MD, Medical Director, POC Advisor, Wolters Kluwer for his thoughts on these recent definition changes and how they may impact physicians and the patients.

(Editor’s note: To hear audio excerpts of this interview, click on the media player buttons that run throughout this article.)

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Halifax Health,POC Advisor,sepsis,Wolters Kluwer

The promise of a new beginning: On the call with Ginny Kwong, MD, Vice President, Chief Medical Information Officer, Halifax Health

kwong_ginny_md

Chuni (Ginny) Kwong, MD, Vice President, Chief Medical Information Officer, Halifax Health

In a previous set of interviews with Jim O’Brien, MD, MSc, Vice President of Quality and Patient Safety, Ohio Health Riverside Methodist Hospital and Stephen Claypool, MD, Medical Director, POC Advisor, Wolters Kluwer, we learned about the ravages of sepsis and how POC Advisor’s electronic surveillance and alerts assist in sepsis detection.  

To continue our “Countdown to HIMSS’16” series, I contacted Ginny Kwong, MD, Vice President, Chief Medical Information Officer, Halifax Health. Dr. Kwong and her organization just recently partnered with Wolters Kluwer (HIMSS’16 booth #5537) to implement POC Advisor in 2016. 

When we spoke, some of the topics she outlined included:

  • how healthcare has approached sepsis in the past;
  • the inherent difficulties of accurately detecting sepsis;
  • her philosophy for working effectively with vendors;
  • the steps Halifax Health took in selecting Wolters Kluwer as a partner to address sepsis and
  • her organization’s projected goals for POC Advisor.

(Editor’s note: This is part one of a two-part series. We will publish the progress of Halifax Health’s efforts utilizing POC Advisor to address sepsis later in the year. To hear audio excerpts of this interview, click on the media player buttons that run throughout this article.)

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CDS,clinical decision support,electronic alarms,electronic surveillance,Huntsville Hospital,Ohio Health Riverside Methodist Hospital,POC Advisor,sepsis,Sepsis Alliance,Wolters Kluwer

A new tool for an old fight: Using electronic surveillance and alerts to detect sepsis

Historically, sepsis has been one of the most important medical conditions in the United States, yet it is not properly appreciated by many in terms of its real significance. Unlike heart disease and cancer, where most people at least generally know about the tremendous number of deaths and the financial impacts they create, sepsis is somewhat of a mystery to the general public.

According to the National Institute of General Medical Studies, sepsis strikes more than a million Americans every year and between 28 and 50 percent of these people die – far more than the number of U.S. deaths from prostate cancer, breast cancer and AIDS combined. While a great deal of improvement has been made in treating high-profile conditions in the last 10-15 years, sepsis is lagging behind in where it could and should be in terms of care. It costs billions of dollars to the healthcare industry, but by-and-large, care for sepsis in the United States is sub-par. 

To learn more about sepsis and its seemingly ambiguous presence within day-to-day healthcare environments, I spoke with Jim O’Brien, MD, MSc, Vice President of Quality and Patient Safety, Ohio Health Riverside Methodist Hospital, an 860-bed community teaching hospital in Columbus, Ohio.

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