Calgary Scientific’s blog

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November 29, 2016

Image sharing supports Triple Aim's goal of lowered costs

By Josh Nash

This post is the last in a series that addresses how enterprise image access and viewing, using a mobile enterprise image viewer such as ResolutionMD, meets the three goals of healthcare reform’s Triple Aim: better care for individuals, better health for populations and lower costs.

Rising costs are a critical concern of all facets of the healthcare industry. To address the issue, one of the Triple Aim’s goals is reducing the per capita cost of healthcare. This blog looks at how the implementation of an enterprise image viewer can support this goal by enabling providers to share images, eliminating duplicate image study costs and enabling specialists to confer with primary and emergency care physicians without having to be physically present.

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November 22, 2016

How telestroke and image sharing meet Triple Aim’s population health goals

By Josh Nash

This post is the second in a series that addresses how enterprise image access and viewing, using a mobile enterprise image viewer such as ResolutionMD, meets the three goals of healthcare reform’s Triple Aim: better care for individuals, better health for populations and lower costs.

Improving access to appropriate care, particularly regarding specialized care for urgent, severe and complicated conditions, is a key component of the population health leg of Triple Aim’s goals. Another primary goal is to generate improved health outcomes and fewer complications for patient populations served by a healthcare system.

Both of these goals are addressed by telestroke, which has revolutionized the treatment and care of stroke patients. This post focuses on how telestroke and image sharing enables broad changes in the treatment and outcomes of stroke patients through access to stroke specialists and fast acting drug treatments.

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November 11, 2016

How enterprise imaging meets Triple Aim’s goal of better patient experience of care

By Josh Nash

The Triple Aim, developed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), is a framework for optimizing the United State’s health system by:

  • Improving the patient experience of care
  • Improving the health of populations
  • Reducing the per capita cost of health care

In this post we’ll look at how enterprise image viewing improves patient experience of care, in both quality and satisfaction, by allowing providers to collaborate and giving patients and their families the ability to view patient images and better understand their conditions and diagnosis.

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October 27, 2016

Frankenstein mix of old tech with new health IT security leads to HIPAA violations

By Jonathan Draper

Recent news of fines for HIPAA violations are shining a spotlight on the need for providers to secure protected health information (PHI) with tools that support modern security. On October 18, the Office of Civil Rights (OCR) announced that St. Joseph Health (SJH) will pay $2.14 million fine for HIPAA violation. The provenance of this violation offers an important lesson for all providers who want to mitigate their risk.

The violation occurred between 2011 and 2012 when SJH installed a server that included a file-sharing application with default settings that provided access to anyone with an Internet connection. This open door made the PHI of 31,800 people publically accessible through Internet search engines during the violation period.

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October 17, 2016

Radiology primary use of telehealth in booming virtual care industry

By Jonathan Draper

Recent data from the American Telehealth Association[1] shows radiology leading the use of telehealth for patient care. About 20 million Americans benefitted by receiving care via telehealth and in 8 million of those cases the care was from radiology. In comparison, 1.9 million were cardiac monitoring cases, 750,000 were online primary care or urgent care sessions, 650,000 were neurophysiological monitoring cases and another 500,000 were mental health sessions.

At the same time, overall growth of telehealth as a care delivery method is booming. Modern Healthcare[2] reports that 75 percent of employers plan to include a telehealth option for their employee health insurance benefits by 2017. At health providers, the focus of telehealth implementation is shifting from interventions, such as telestroke, to broader, integrated services. These trends, among others, will create a five-fold increase in the value of the market by 2017. An Accenture report[3] valued it at $200 million in 2014 and predicts it will hit $1 billion in 2017.

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October 7, 2016

Today’s enterprise image viewing needs: Multi-platform, multi-modality, multi-format and multi-departmental

By Jonathan Draper

Digital patient imaging is in the midst of a sea of change. First, the use of digital patient imaging is expanding outside radiology into other clinical departments such as dermatology, ophthalmology, pathology and more, expanding both the modalities and numbers of images. At the same time, value-based care, cost pressures and adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) has increased the need to share patient images outside radiology. As these two trends rapidly advance, hospitals and health systems need to manage patient images across the enterprise, which requires new strategies and technologies.

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September 30, 2016

Answering the complex questions of VNA implementation with an enterprise image viewer

By Jonathan Draper

The concept behind vendor-neutral archives (VNAs) appeals broadly to today’s healthcare providers: a non-proprietary archive of patient images of any type and any image-related data that can be accessed from any PACS or enterprise image viewer. With their promise of access to all images and image data regardless of provenance, VNAs are quickly becoming a central element of medical enterprise image management[1] strategies.

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September 16, 2016

Providers go mobile to advance healthcare reform

By Jonathan Draper

Mobile devices are playing an increasingly important role in clinical care, particularly as providers work to shift to value-based care. Sharing patient data, both to coordinate care and decrease duplicative imaging and testing, is a key component of value-based care. Today, providers recognize that smartphones and tablets make this patient data access convenient and efficient.

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September 9, 2016

New model for stroke care brings the hospital to the patient

By Josh Nash

In the United States, the 2015 rate of stroke incidence was just under 800,000 people a year. A particularly disturbing contribution to this statistic is the increasing number of strokes among those aged 50 to 55, which has resulted in a corresponding increase in hospitalizations[1]. With these changes, stroke is an increasingly important topic of concern for hospitals today as they focus on population health. One way that providers are improving care is to literally bring the hospital to the patient in a mobile stroke unit, or MSU.

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September 2, 2016

Calgary Scientific primed to meet growing diagnostic imaging needs across Asia

By Jonathan Draper

The use of diagnostic imaging is increasing across the globe and the total market is expected to reach $45 billion by 2022.[1] Asia-Pacific is the fastest growing segment of this market due to many of the same issues that have impacted the growth of imaging in North America and Europe. These factors include growth in incidence of chronic disease, aging populations and government healthcare initiatives for the modernization of healthcare infrastructures.

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August 12, 2016

Leading providers rapidly adopting mobile strategies for clinical care

By Dave Waldrop

Today’s hospitals have infrastructure and systems in place so users can share and access electronic patient data. Unfortunately, just because clinicians can share patient data with other providers does not mean they do so. In fact, recent news from the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) shows that only 18 percent of providers use data from outside sources to treat patients.[1]

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July 15, 2016

Modern security tech essential for safe mobile access to patient health data

By Jonathan Draper

Recent headlines of healthcare security breaches:

  • Hackers breach 4,300 records at Massachusetts General Hospital.[1] 
  • Millions of patient records for sale on the dark web. [2] 
  • 11 million patient record breaches make June worst month for information security in 2016. [3]

According to a report from Bitglass, up to 68 percent of these break-ins can be traced to device theft, making hospital IT managers ever more strict about using mobile devices to access patient data. [4]

With 70 percent of physicians relying on their mobile devices to manage patient data, however, providers believe they must choose between either open or closed networks. Health IT managers can either block physicians from using their mobile devices or they can increase their risk by opening enterprise networks to patient data. There is a third alternative: Working with health IT tools that provide the modern security required by the needs of today’s healthcare environments.

What modern mobile health IT tools need is built-in support for the following security technologies:

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June 17, 2016

Martin Luther King Jr. Hospital’s providers deliver clinical care with mobile devices

By Jonathan Draper

When Sajid Ahmed took the job as Chief Information and Innovation Officer at South Los Angeles-based Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital (MLKCH) he realized he had been handed an extremely unique opportunity: The chance to design a health information technology platform for clinical care from the ground up. Ahmed was the second hire for a project to build a completely new facility to replace a hospital that had been closed in 2007.

In 2014, mobile fever had taken hold of physicians, with 78 percent saying they were using iPhone or iPads at home and/or at work. Ahmed saw the writing on the wall and knew that mobile health IT would be the right platform to connect the right caregiver to the right patient in the right place at the right time. With no legacy systems to create technical stumbling blocks, Ahmed and his colleagues had the right environment to implement a completely mobile health IT system for delivering clinical care at the hospital.

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June 7, 2016

Millennials shine light on a mobile future for clinical care

By Jonathan Draper

In 2015, there were three times as many smartphones sold than there were babies born every day. With a statistic like that, it’s no wonder that mobile technology is redefining all sectors of 21st century society, including healthcare. Today, mobile access to patient information, diagnostic tools and provider-to-provider communication is transforming care delivery at hospitals.

In clinical care settings, mobile devices allow physicians to move their patient information with them as they see patients and confer with colleagues. With mobile access to electronic health records (EHRs) and patient images, providers can skip side trips to computer clusters or offices and concentrate on their time and focus on patients instead. Mobile devices’ always-on connectivity also make physicians more efficient by eliminating time spent logging in and out of computers and workstations to view patient records and images.

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May 27, 2016

Smartphones in clinical settings is a future that health IT departments need to address today

By Jonathan Draper

In 2015, there were three times as many smartphones sold than there were babies born every day. With a statistic like that, it’s no wonder that mobile technology is redefining all sectors of 21st century society, including healthcare. Today, mobile access to patient information, diagnostic tools and provider-to-provider communication is transforming care delivery at hospitals.

In clinical care settings, mobile devices allow physicians to move their patient information with them as they see patients and confer with colleagues. With mobile access to electronic health records (EHRs) and patient images, providers can skip side trips to computer clusters or offices and concentrate on their time and focus on patients instead. Mobile devices’ always-on connectivity also make physicians more efficient by eliminating time spent logging in and out of computers and workstations to view patient records and images.

Read more

 

May 13, 2016

Face-to-face communication between radiologists and referring physicians improves patient care

By Jonathan Draper

For many years now, radiologists have practiced their speciality on workstations in reading rooms, sending reports to referring physicians via email or other hospital communications systems. Unlike the days of film and light boxes, when radiologists and referring physicians would discuss patient care while viewing images, today’s radiology workflow rarely includes face-to-face meetings with other providers and almost never involves interactions with patients. This workflow, however, is increasingly under pressure to change. New research shows that in-person communications between radiologists and referring physicians improves patient care.

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April 29, 2016

The value of interoperability: We’ve come a long way

By Lorelle Lapstra

I’ve worked in medical imaging for over 25 years and in that time I’ve seen the industry take amazing strides forward on the road to better patient care. When I compare today’s technology stack, the clinical breakthroughs, image quality and support for interoperability to where they were when I first began my career, it’s remarkable how far we’ve come. Industry players have matured from a proprietary, don’t share anything approach, to embracing standards and interoperability focused on improving patient care and cutting health care spending.

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April 15, 2016

SAR 2016 Conference attendees experience the future of radiology

By Jonathan Draper

Clinicians from Cleveland Clinic and UC San Francisco Discuss Using Enterprise Viewer at Annual Gathering

The impact of cross-platform and mobile access to patient images is changing the workflow of radiologists, including their professional conferences and continuing medical education (CME). At the Society of Abdominal Radiology (SAR) 2016 annual meeting, BYOD support for accessing patient images played a significant role in the individual experience of participants. The conference’s “Small Bowel Imaging Hands-On Workshop” and Case of the Day program allowed attendees to experience how enterprise image access from laptops, smartphones and tablets will transform both their training and their day-to-day workflow.

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April 8, 2016

Peer-reviewed published research shows mobile devices support accurate image-viewing and interpretation

By Jonathan Draper

When providers and healthcare institutions look at adopting new technology into clinical practice, their first consideration is the impact on patient care. To find information and evidence that a new technology is safe and effective for patient care, providers turn to peer-reviewed, published research. These reports and studies of new technology provide supporting data and evidence that a new technology will improve patient care.

Research on using technology in life threatening situations, such as stroke care, is particularly important to clinicians. Telestroke, the use of telehealth technology for stroke care, has been thoroughly studied and is now widely accepted as a standard of care. One area of telestroke that has been studied in depth is the use of mobile devices for stroke patient scan viewing, interpretation and diagnosis.

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March 22, 2016

HIMSS 2016 buzz: Interoperability and the cloud

By Lorelle Lapstra

This year’s HIMSS was another massive event, leaving no doubt about the critical role that health IT continues to have in all aspects of healthcare. The 2016 show had 42,000 attendees and 1200 exhibitors; it was virtually almost impossible to get around the entire exhibit floor, not to mention the conference panels and education sessions. Rising above the noise were strong themes of interoperability and the increasing presence of the cloud, both of which shifted from topics of discussion to product demonstrations and implementation showcases.

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March 11, 2016

Study by leading health organization and Arizona State University researchers shows mobile image-viewers offer clinicians fast, accurate image access

By Randy Rountree

Mobile image-viewers have the power to increase provider access to images both internally and remotely, which can lead to faster interpretation/consultations and improved patient outcomes. Selecting an enterprise image-viewer, however, is a complicated process for clinical environments. In choosing the right clinical image-viewer, a multitude of factors must be considered including integration with existing picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) and other radiology information management systems, security, standards support, performance and more.

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March 2, 2016

Addressing incidental findings and patient follow up with collaboration

By Jonathan Draper

Advances in imaging technology and increasingly refined image quality is a double-edged sword for providers. While high-quality imaging systems offer a wealth of information for diagnosing and patient care, they also uncover incidental findings unrelated to the primary reason for the patient’s scan. Addressing and managing incidental findings, which occur in more than a third of CT scans make them hardly incidental, which is a matter of consistent concern for providers.

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February 19, 2016

FDA encourages interoperability - Factors for healthcare IT to consider

By Jonathan Draper

True Interoperability Must Be Designed

Every day, hospitals and health systems across the country struggle with exchanging patient data between electronic health records, PACS and other health information systems. In a recent survey, for example, accountable care organizations (ACOs) cited lack of interoperability as their number one challenge to achieving improved, patient-centered care. (1) To solve this problem, legislators, industry associations, public-private partnerships and more are calling for industry standards, frameworks and legislation that support simple and safe patient data exchange. On January 26th, the FDA joined this industry-wide chorus with the release of a draft guidance titled “Design Considerations and Pre-Market Submission: Recommendations for Interoperable Medical Devices.”

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Calgary Scientific, diagnostic imaging, enterprise image, HIPAA, mobile enterprise image viewer, PACS, radiology, ResolutionMD, telestroke, Triple Aim, vendor-neutral archive, VNA

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